Trauma Informed Care


Better recognize, understand, and address the effects of trauma

The first lady is working in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Children and Families and various private organizations to better recognize, understand, and address the effects of trauma on the lives of children and families in Wisconsin.

Developments in neuroscience and public health have taught us that adverse childhood experiences cause an outpouring of the stress hormones that, over time, change the way the brain grows, develops, and reacts to the environment and to other people – even years down the line.

Traumatic stress can create problems with forming relationships, regulating and controlling emotions, perceiving danger where there is none, and even physical health in adult life. Traditional therapy alone does not address these changes, and trauma-informed therapy is much more effective at reversing the negative effects of trauma.  

In partnership with various foundations and nonprofit organizations, the first lady is working to build on current momentum to bring lasting, positive change to children and families in Wisconsin by implementing a new, research-based approach that leverages information to help children and families move beyond cycles of harm caused by adverse childhood experiences. In doing so, she hopes to establish the State of Wisconsin as a national leader in the Trauma Informed Care movement.